It is every girl’s basic human right to have access to a quality education and the chance to shape her own future. 

Vee KativhuHowever, there are 129 million girls missing out on an education worldwide - and it is estimated that Covid-19 has put 2.5 million more girls at risk of underage marriage, causing the greatest surge in child marriage in 25 years.

From 28th November - 4th December 2021, we're delighted to be featured as this week’s BBC Radio 4 appeal, shining a spotlight on and raising vital funds for girls' education with the incredible education activist and dedicated UWS supporter Vee Kativhu.

You can listen to our appeal and make a donation on the BBC Radio 4 appeal page, or donate directly to United World Schools to transform a girl's future through education. 

Donate now


Our work

We believe that girls should have the same education and opportunities as boys. We’re supporting female education and empowering girls so that they can choose to be whoever they want to be, and create whatever future they want for themselves. 

Preeti studyingWe champion girls’ education, only building schools where communities are committed to sending both girls and boys to school and giving them the same opportunities. We train local teachers, empower students and parents and partner with regional and national governments to make sure that every child can go to school and learn.

We work to keep girls in school by providing proper hygiene and sanitation facilities, educating teachers on equality and implicit bias and by helping girls to find their voice and advocate for themselves.  We also ensure that we do targeted interventions with children most vulnerable to make sure we do everything we can to prevent them dropping out of school to work or get married.

Preeti, 10, from rural Nepal is the first girl in her family to ever go to school. She attends UWS Helawubesi School: “I like the school environment and enjoy studying. I feel glad when our teachers let us play – I love to skip. My favourite subject is Nepali. When I grow up, I want to become a doctor.”

Just £10 could educate a girl for an entire month - donate today and help a girl like Preeti go to school for the first time.

Educate a girl


Tev's story

Tev and her students

Tev grew up in the tiny village of La Meuy in Cambodia, which is so remote that for generations, no school existed. Without a school to go to, children started working around the age of 6 - farming the stubborn land and undertaking gruelling domestic duties.

When Tev was just 13 years old, marrying an older man to support her family seemed like her only option. But, by working with her local community to build a school, United World Schools gave Tev a different choice. 

Today, Tev is 23 years old and now works as a United World Schools early years teacher, at that very same school in La Meuy where she was a student. She’s empowering other girls from her community and enabling them to find their voice.

“I am really happy with a big smile when I see all of my students come to class," says Tev. "In cases where they are absent a lot, I feel worried and I am afraid they will follow in the footsteps of my life from before.”

Although schools have re-opened in Cambodia and around the world, many families are still feeling the pressure. During lockdown, school closures and economic pressures on families have made it much more likely that girls will drop out of education. Dropping out of school means girls are more vulnerable to child marriage, early pregnancy, and remaining trapped in a cycle of poverty. 

But through female education, we can change the story for thousands of girls like Tev. United World Schools has transformed hundreds of communities and reached 45,000 children in Nepal, Myanmar, Cambodia and Madagascar with a life-changing education - and with your support, we can help even more children around the world.  

Donate now


Donate to Girls’ Education

Girl Education

It is every girl’s basic human right to have access to a quality education and the chance to shape her own future. Women’s education is a vital and important tool which, over time, can uplift economies, improve health and even save lives. 

Donate now